Self-Isolation Fatigue? 5 Tips to Boost your Energy Levels — Naturally

Self-Isolation Fatigue? 5 Tips to Boost your Energy Levels — Naturally

Recent Article

Feeling exhausted despite staying inside all day? You’re not alone.

As a result of the current uncertainty, significant lifestyle changes and elevated stress levels are making it difficult for us to remain productive and stick to a routine. Given this, it’s now more important than ever that we continue to work on prioritising our physical and mental health to ensure long-term wellbeing.

Targeting energy levels is an important first step. Energy is an important ingredient in our productivity, keeping us alert and focused and helping us to avoid feeling fatigued and lethargic. In order to boost energy, we’ve outlined five easy methods to boost energy levels whilst staying at home.

  1. Set a sleep schedule

During this stressful time, we are no longer able to dedicate ourselves to a routine sleep schedule based on our normally balanced days of work and life. However, sleep is critical both for our physical and mental health and has been shown to assist in the regulation of immune cells that fight off infection.[1]

For adults, the recommended amount of sleep is 8 hours a night.[2] If you’re feeling lethargic or fatigued, try to regulate your sleep routine and go to bed at the same time each evening, and aim for up to 8 hours of sleep a night.[3]

  1. Take a walk

It’s now easier than ever to get caught up inside and allow your work/life priorities to shift, especially if you are balancing running a household with working from home. However, it is still important to take breaks throughout the day and leave your desk for your physical and mental health. Physical activity has been proven to release endorphins and serotonin in the body, increasing feelings of joy and satisfaction and helping to restore energy levels.[4]

Give yourself a boost of energy through a brisk 15-minute walk around the block, helping you get fresh air and helping to reduce feelings of fatigue.[5]

  1. Hydrate yourself

Water is essential to maintaining optimal body function and keeping your energy levels high. Dehydration can affect your brain function, mood and energy levels[6].

Make sure to regularly drink water throughout the day, even if you don’t feel thirsty, to maintain your cognitive function and physical health. Always ensure you are following health guidelines, with current recommendations 1.5-2L of water per day.[7]

  1. Fuel your body with nutrients

Whilst it’s easy to go straight for the sugar and processed foods to give you a quick energy burst, this often can leave you feeling sluggish and lethargic.[8]

To avoid this, try to stock your pantry with foods rich in vitamins and nutrients, making them easily accessible for when hunger strikes. Proteins such as green vegetables and lean meats as well as legumes providing iron and zinc can keep you feel fuller and nourished for longer.[9] Healthy snacks such as nuts, fruits, popcorn, hummus and rice cakes can also keep you powering through that afternoon slump.[10] You may also find it helpful to plan out your week to ensure energy levels remain consistent.

  1. Supplement with Ubiquinol

If you’re finding it hard to keep up with your daily diet and you see yourself reaching for the caffeine for your source of energy, it may be worth looking into natural supplements such as Ubiquinol.

Ubiquinol, the active form of naturally occurring antioxidant Coq10, is essential for energy production in the cells of our body and provides protection against inflammation and oxidative stress. However, as we age, our body’s natural levels of Ubiquinol tend to decline, potentially causing tiredness and effecting productivity and overall wellbeing.[11] Consider supplementation to help support your natural    energy levels and ensure you’re functioning at your best.

 

Always read the label. User only as directed. If symptoms persist consult your health care practitioner.

 

[1] https://www.sleephealthfoundation.org.au/getting-good-sleep-during-the-covid-19-pandemic.html

[2] https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/healthy-sleep-habits

[3] J Psychosom Res. 2004 Nov;57(5):427-33.

[4] Dolan P., Kavetsos, G. and Vlaev, I. The Happiness Workout. Social Indicators Research. 2013; 119: 1363-1377.

[5] https://alifeofproductivity.com/exactly-how-long-your-work-breaks-should-be/

[6] https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition/article/mild-dehydration-impairs-cognitive-performance-and-mood-of-men/3388AB36B8DF73E844C9AD19271A75BF

[7] https://www.nutritionaustralia.org/sites/default/files/Healthy%20Hydration.pdf

[8] https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/obr.12107

[9] https://www.heartfoundation.org.au/healthy-eating/food-and-nutrition/protein-foods/legumes-nuts-and-seeds

[10] https://www.abc.net.au/life/healthy-afternoon-snack-ideas-to-get-you-through-afternoon-slump/10770024

[11] Hernandez-Camacho, J.D., Bernier, M., Lopez-Lluch, G. and Navas, P. (2018). Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation in Aging and Disease. Frontiers in Physiology 9: 44.

You can share this by:

Ubiquinol Headlines

Get the best results from your exercise routine with Ubiquinol

Category: Antioxidants, Endurance, Energy, Fitness, Health, Nutrition, online, Ubiquinol, VitaminsRead More

National Families Week – Be good to your heart & good to your family

Category: Ageing, Antioxidants, Energy, Fatigue, Fitness, Heart, UbiquinolRead More

Power Up: 5 key facts you need to know about Ubiquinol

Category: Ageing, Antioxidants, Endurance, Energy, Fatigue, Fitness, Health, Health Industry, Heart, Ubiquinol, VitaminsRead More
1 2 36 37